Klytie Pate 2018 – catalogue and people’s choice

Thank you for your votes!

The winner of the People’s choice award in 2018 is Tania Vrancic. Her piece submitted in 2018 was No. 4 ‘Rest’

 


1 – Betty Mitlan

Betty Mitlan Kimonos

Kimonos by Betty Mitlan

1a Kimonos

Raku Fired Ceramics

Artist statement

The concept of these Kimonos began on a journey through Japan, becoming the inspiration to express something of the artistry of these people who I encountered and who I have always revered.

Working with a porcelain / stoneware and decorated with specialised precious metal glazes, then Raku fired, they have survived this ancient Japanese form of firing to result in these unique pieces


1b Sake Tray Set

Betty Mitlan Saki Tray Set

Raku Fired Ceramics

Artist statement

The concept of this set has evolved also from the recent tour of Japan, an from soaking in this amazing Eastern culture.

The challenge of pulling oworks from the Raku kiln at 1000 degrees Celcius, to successfully produce pieces despite the pitfalls of thermal shock and others, does require patience and experience.

My objective being to produce unique, elegant Raku fired work successfully


1c Eucalypts

Betty Mitlan EucalyptsRaku Fired Ceramics

Artist statement

The success fo these shell shaped pieces is something of a challenge to remain intacet and emerge successfully through this firing process. The use of four separate and specialised precious metal glazes has embellished the surface of each unique piece.

 


2 – Narumi Ii

Narumi Ii - If you can see2a If you can see

Porcelain / Nerikomi

Artist statement

Beautiful nature makes Australia special. However, it is currently under such a danger of destruction. I wanted to show the hidden beauty under water and the need for its protection. All the elements including 6 kinds of fish were made with coloured porcelain and laid out by hand. Both sides of the bowl have the same pattern like transparent water.


2b First Date

Narumi Ii - First Date

Narumi Ii – First Date – Winner of the 2018 Mark Brabham Award for an Emerging Artist

Porcelain / Nerikomi

Artist statement

As a Japanese, I had grown up with a pond with beautiful and lively Koi fish nearby. With this plate, I wanted to create a scene of their life, a romantic first date of this Koi couple. Each scale of the fish and all the elements including leaves were made with coloured porcelain and laid out by hand myself.


2c Beginning of Blue

Narumi Ii Beginning of Blue

Porcelain / Nerikomi

Artist statement

This piece is my ultimate exploration of integrity which consists of tiny individual elements which also have their integrity within themselves. Each little element is a breakdown of a colour “blue” which creates one whole “blue” piece. Nerikomi technique is the perfect way to DE-construct and RE-construct my notion of “blue”. One of the most abundant colours on Earth.


3 – Jennifer Gibney

Jenny Gibney The Lyrebird3a The Lyrebird

Porcelain 160×200

Artist statement

This porcelain piece is hand-built and very slowly dried, bisque and clear glazed then onglaze colour is applied sparingly.

I wanted to show the beauty of the lyre bird in the bush setting in a lyrical way.


3b Women

Jennifer Gibney - Women

Porcelain

Artist statement

These African women standing in a line tell a story that the viewer has to make up for themselves. They are porcelain, with onglaze colours on clear glaze.


3c Circle of friends

Jennifer Gibney - Circle of Friends

Porcelain, 250 x 150 cm

Artist statement

This piece accentuates the innocence of the little girls. I have tried to portray the simple quality of friendship that young children have before they become old enough for power games and petty jealousies to have a bearing on their relationships with each other.


4 – Tania Vrancic

Tania Vrancic - RestRest

Imperial porcelain slip and stains, 110 x 120 x 95
320 x8 x70
364 x 102 x 107

Artist statement

Creating art is often a journey of self-discovery.  I tend to make intuitively with the subtle meaning behind my work unfolding over time.  My current work Rest is reminiscent of mossy, lichen covered rocks and trees found here in Australia and my childhood home, Finland.  I enjoy the challenge of working with porcelain and its translucency.


5 – Di Peach

Libertea

Dianne Peach - LIBERTEA

Slab-built stoneware, 240 h x 230 w x 90 d

Artist statement

The teapot is a recurring subject for its infinite variations and its association with home and hospitality.  Using stiff slabs I can assemble a cubist version of the traditionally spherical form, and pursue a geometric solution with clean lines and sharp edges. I reinforce the abstraction with bold patterned areas using underglazes only as I like the feel of the unglazed, high-fired surface.


6 – Robyn Phelan

Robyn Phelan - River VesselRiver Vessel

hand pinched stoneware, oxides, stains & glaze

Artist statement

Ceramic objects, by their very permanence, are keepers of memories and experiences. Reference to art history, a sense of place and concern the environment inform my work.

How does one capture the essence of a mountain stream, one that has been visited for so many years?

How does one make permanent the sound, colour, texture and sparkle of water as it rushes over smooth stones and the astringent smell of vegetation as it is sustained by Delatite River.

Robyn Phelan works in sculptural ceramics and is based in Melbourne, Australia.

Her professional background is in visual arts and museum education, curation and management. A ceramics practice has been her most recent pursuit. Working from the Elm Place Ceramics Studios, Robyn is also an avid writer and observer of Australian contemporary ceramics, pottery and art. 


7 – Laura Dortmans

Laura Dortmans - Pass it on7a Pass it on

Wood-fired stoneware with natural ash glaze and shino brushmark, 50 x 280 x 280

Around our family dinner table food is shared over excited conversation and the laughter of three generations; platters are passed, table manners are taught, stories are told and lessons are handed down. This platter was created in Japan, fired in an anagama kiln in upstate New York, then brought home to Australia to find its place at our family table.


7b Bubble Vessel

Laura Dortmans - Bubble Vessel

Wood-fired stoneware with shino and natural ash

Artist statement

This work captures the delight of wood-firing. Whilst the work was created to explore material and aesthetic concerns, the true joy is in the play of fire, oxygen and ash on the surface. I am fascinated by this relationship between the form that is created by hand and those forces that really shape a piece and bring it to life.


7c Sister, No. 1

Laura Dortmans - Sister Number 1

Wood fired porcelain, 205 x 90 x 90

This work, from my ‘Sisters’ series, was created for the anagama firing at Peters Valley, New Jersey, USA. The five unique porcelain vessels in the series fired beautifully, drawing subtle tones of purple and green from the clay and the glaze. Flecks of dark stone from a Californian freshwater creek bring texture to the clay, creating a dynamic surface.


8 – Bill Powell

Bill Powell - Arid Traces

Arid Traces

High fired textured stoneware

21 cm h 40 cm wide

Artist statement

This piece utilises high fired glaze and stretched textured dark stoneware to evoke expressions of our arid inland landscape and the paths traced by her inhabitants , past and present.

 


9 – Janetta Kerr Grant

Janetta Kerr-Grant - Midnight Sun, FiskarsMidnight Sun, Fiskars

Winner, 2018 Klytie Pate Ceramics Award

Porcelain, hand-built. Black oxide slip, limestone glaze, 22cm h x 45 cm w x 39 cm

Artist statement

This pair of handbuilt porcelain vessels arises from a residency I undertook at Fiskars, an artists’ collective village deep in the forests of Finland.

I spent time observing and documenting the nearby rocks, grasses and trees as my way of coming to terms with unfamiliar surroundings. Pattern, texture, shadows and silhouettes informs these vessels.


10 – Julie Pennington

Julie Pennington - Catching the LightCatching the Light (Pair)

Handbuilt porcelain / Feeneys Chocolate

22.5 x 5.5 x 5.5
23 x 6 x 6

Artist statement

My ceramics practice is primarily concerned with making porcelain objects, with a particular focus on the vessel as a starting point. I am interested in creating pattern and texture by adding and subtracting clay elements to create positive and negative space, light, dark and shadows. The work develops in an intuitive way that allows the material and making process to inform my work.


11 – Aleisa Byfield

Aleisa Byfield - Delight in DecayDelight in Decay

Ceramic, 440x550x70

 

Artist statement

My work emulates the fragility and imperfections of the decaying, yet beautifully alluring, tree bark that has been marked by borers.

Hand rolled into the cylindrical forms, I have used Earthenware and Raku clays imprinted and decorated with a variety of low fire glazes and underglazes, with the addition of sand and salt flakes for texture at varying temperatures. 


12 – Sarah Tracton

Retreat Forward

The making process involves building architectural porcelain slabs from pouring porcelain slip onto a porous Plaster of Paris slab. Slip is then poured layer by layer onto the slab with stain additions, then the sheets are peeled away.

Joins are constructed over several days and the final piece is dried slowly over weeks then fired to 1280 degrees

420 mm x 130 mm

Artist statement

Ceramics has been a vital form of catharsis in channelling my creativity in response to my journey towards deafness.

Cyber technology has enabled me a recent freedom. Working with vibrant pops of colour and the translucent light of porcelain encapsulates this feeling. Iridescent prismatic oranges and chromatic panorama coloured surfaces akin to landscape topography are revealed.

Retreat Forward reflects my enhanced colour sensory and tactile perception upon returning to the world of sound.


13 – Kirsten Perry

Kirsten Perry - PodsPods

Slip cast mid fire various glazes

35 x 25 x 35

Artist statement

Slip cast mid fire, various glazes

I investigate the relationship between elements of error, chance, anthropomorphism and humour. Traditionally, errors are discareded or covered up but I like to challenge this aesthetic by highlighting and exaggerating errors, especially through humour. I cast objects or textures not usually associated with ceramics, such as paper, foam and cardboard. This process has the ability to transform the object’s  original purpose and value.


14 – Lee Goller

14a Embedded in Darkness – Container

Lee Goller - Embedded in Darkness - Container

Feeney’s Chocolate clay, coloured engobes and glaze, oxidized to 1220, 400 mm x 25o mm

Artist statement

The notion of indigenous songlines fascinates me, with its implication of stories and maps embedded in the land.  In my own work the story lies in depicting the complexity of contemporary reality, in which the story is fragmentary and many-layered.  Thus, text, images and imprints of found and made objects are embedded into, and layered on to, the clay.


14b Embedded in Landscape – Teapot form

Lee Goller - Embedded in Landscape - Teapot form

Porcelain Paper Clay, Feeney’s Chocolate clay, coloured engobes and glaze, oxidized to 1220

Artist statement

The notion of indigenous songlines fascinates me, with its implication of stories and maps embedded in the land.  In my own work the story lies in depicting the complexity of contemporary reality, in which the story is fragmentary and many-layered.  Thus, text, images and imprints of found and made objects are embedded into, and layered on to, the clay.


14c Layered Landscape – Jug

Lee Goller - Layered Landscape - Jug

Red stoneware, engobes, glazes. 1280, reduction, 250 x 150

Artist statement

The notion of indigenous songlines fascinates me, with its implication of stories and maps embedded in the land.  In my own work the story lies in depicting the complexity of contemporary reality, in which the story is fragmentary and many-layered.  Thus, text, images and imprints of found and made objects are embedded into, and layered on to, the clay.


15 – Wendy Jagger

15a Cosy Corner Memories

Wendy Jagger - Cosy Corner Memories

Wheel thrown, porcelain, stained slips, clear glaze
205 x 235

Artist statement

Recording the landscape at various elevations from sea level to the ‘roof of Oz’ has been the focus of Wendy Jagger’s art practice for the past year. Painting ‘en plein air’ in gouache and oils, Wendy has observed the similarities and variations of land formations. Her studies saw her travelling the east coast of Victoria and up to Kosciusko National Park, as well as across Bass Strait to capture the incredible shapes of Tasmania. These ‘aides des memoires’ informed the creation of her new Scape vessels, which be an integral element of her exhibition, ‘Elevation’.


15b Blizzard of Oz

Wheel thrown porcelain, stained slips, clear glaze

Wendy Jagger - Blizzard of Oz

Artist statement

Recording the landscape at various elevations from sea level to the ‘roof of Oz’ has been the focus of Wendy Jagger’s art practice for the past year. Painting ‘en plein air’ in gouache and oils, Wendy has observed the similarities and variations of land formations. Her studies saw her travelling the east coast of Victoria and up to Kosciusko National Park, as well as across Bass Strait to capture the incredible shapes of Tasmania. These ‘aides des memoires’ informed the creation of her new Scape vessels, which be an integral element of her exhibition, ‘Elevation’.


16 – Montessa Maack

Montessa Maack - SpeakSpeak

stoneware, clay, woodfired, found rock, 300 x 360 x 200

 

Artist statement

We are in crisis. We are have inflicted irreversible damage on the planet. New technologies and medias are developing fast and affecting our lives deeply. I use the ceramics medium to inquire. Debates regarding the medium, the relevance of functionality and the nature of the object, are useful tools in trying to tackle the larger questions of the state of where we are now.


17 – Shelley Oldham

Shelley Oldham - The Arab SpringThe Arab Spring

Mixed media
90 cm

Artist statement

The war in Syria has changed the world. 

It is the first war that has impacted every continent, primarily through the displacement of people.  It is the first war that gave permission to the world to openly hate the displaced; as if it were they that were responsible.

This replica of a 6th Century artefact highlights the loss of some of the world’s most important ceramic art.  Overlaid with images of the war reflecting the most important of all relationships – mother and children.  Desecrated and torn apart for no meaningful reason.

Primary countries that funded the dropping of bombs and rockets are Russia and United States of America.  Two countries whose economies are dependent on war; an activity that does what you see here to children.

The impact of this war will be felt across the world and its peoples for millennia.


18 – Natalie Rosin

Natalie Rosin - Collaged Vessels (2017)Collaged Vessels (2017)

Ceramic stoneware / handmade slab-built, 130w x 230 h

Artist statement

White Stoneware Paperclay, Matt Indigo, Agrum, Oyster and Custard glazes

Collages Vessels are part of an ongoing narrative throughout my practice, exploring the relationship between ceramics and architecture, focusing on the material temperament of clay and its translation toward architectural form. These vessels are both sculptural, yet functional, arriving at a connection between art, design and craft.